Sandra Oh Urges Support for North Korean Refugee Adoption Act

The Topple Hunger in North Korea (THINK) program, organized by the Korean American Coalition, yesterday posted a video of Sandra Oh urging support for the North Korean Refugee Adoption Act of 2011. Express your support by clicking here (http://kacla.org/?page_id=2535) and filling out a short form that will generate a letter of support to your Members of Congress. Although it’s mentioned in the video, ThinkChildren.org is not yet live as of this posting.

If passed, the Act would allow Americans to adopt refugee orphans who have fled the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) to neighboring countries such as Mongolia, Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries. These children are struggling in harsh circumstances, and run the risk of being sent back to North Korea, a country facing regular food shortages, and where one in three North Korean children under five are chronically malnourished.

Right now, it is extremely difficult to bring refugee children to the United States. One American family on the East Coast is currently working to secure the adoption of two orphaned siblings from North Korea. The adoption process for them could take anywhere from three to 10 years, and approval is not guaranteed. The passage of this Act would reduce the waiting time for families seeking to adopt refugee orphans.

This is not simply an adoption issue, or a Korean American issue. Refugee orphans do not have access to food and clean water, and are vulnerable to human trafficking and deportation. The North Korean Refugee Adoption Act would lessen the burden on parents in the United States who wish to provide a safe and caring home for refugee orphans.

Express your support by clicking here (http://kacla.org/?page_id=2535) and filling out a short form that will generate a letter of support to your Members of Congress.

Topple Hunger in North Korea (THINK) is a program organized by the Korean American Coalition (KAC) to inform the public about famine and humanitarian issues in North Korea, and to increase civic participation in the Korean American community.

Source: KAC